Parashat Yitro: gratitude, compassion and a cross-sensual experience at Sinai


Rabbi Dr. Paul Shrell-Fox, Lecturer in Family and Community Studies at the Schechter Institute of Jewish Studies, discusses two concepts as related in this week’s Parasha.
1. Yitro’s exceptional character; his gratitude to God and the compassion he shows to his son-in-law Moshe and his daughter Zipporah.

2. The voices the nation saw at Sinai: “וכל העם רואים את הקולות.”
Can one actually see a voice?

Find out by watching the video below:

What happens on the streets of Jerusalem during Selichot? Dr. Einat Ramon


Dr. Ramon describes the beautiful scene that takes place at the Western Wall, the Kotel, in the early pre-dawn hours during the month of Elul. She talks with yearning and wonder that will make you want to close your eyes and join her in the next Selichot prayer.

Are you Ready to Leave Egypt? Rabbi Professor David Golinkin Takes the Passover Stage


Lights Camera Action! Drama doesn’t just take place in the movies, on Passover we remember that we too were brought out of Egypt. In preparation for your own seder Rabbi Professor David Golinkin, President of The Schechter Institutes, tells of the custom of reenacting the story of the Exodus and offers a way of bringing the drama to your own seder.

God is in the Details Dr. Paul Mandel on Parshat Terumah


This week in Parshat Terumah Moses and the Israelites are given detailed instructions on how to construct the Tabernacle in the wilderness. How do we make sense of this detailed blueprint: “Make five posts of acacia wood for the screen and overlay them with gold—their hooks being of gold—and cast for them five sockets of copper?” Dr. Paul Mandel, senior lecturer in Midrash at The Schechter Institute of Jewish Studies, offers an intriguing explanation for the uses of different materials in the construction of the tabernacle and the special dividing curtain.

Tisha B’Av’s Place in Contemporary Society


Every year camp counselors confront a dilemma: what content is appropriate for Tisha B’Av when this fast day occurs during the camp season. Should the campers be expected to fast? The counselors? In many cases, commemorating Tisha B’Av is reduced to cancelling swimming or programming an activity related to the rabbinic midrash of Kamtza and Bar Kamtza on the destruction of the Temple. What indeed is Tisha B’Av’s place in contemporary society?