Does Love Keep Us From Being Alone? Rabbi Reb Dr. Mimi Feigelson on Parshat Eikev


How do we overcome aloneness in the world? In Parshat Eikev the word love is used four times as we are commanded to “circumcise our hearts” and love God. Rabbi Dr. Reb Mimi Feigelson, Mashpiah Ruhanit (Spiritual Mentor) and senior lecturer of Rabbinics and Hasidic Thought at the Schechter Rabbinical Seminary, explores these different understandings of commanded love and suggests a connection between loving God and the creation of the first human in Genesis.

The Feminist Message of Parshat Va’etchanan The Ten Commandments


The Ten Commandments appear in the Torah twice: once in the Book of Exodus, in Parshat Yitro, and the second time in Deuteronomy, in Parshat Va’etchanan. The prohibition “Thou shalt not covet” in the Exodus version says “Do not covet the household of your neighbor”, and then lists the neighbor’s belongings: his “wife, his servants, his ox and his donkey.” In Deuteronomy the prohibition is somewhat different. It states, first and foremost, “Thou shalt not covet your neighbor’s wife”, and only then “thou shalt not covet the household of your neighbor”. Why the difference? Read more on how sacred texts change to reflect evolving morality.

What Made Moses a Great Leader? Rabbi Prof. David Golinkin on Parshat Beha'alotcha


What makes a great leader? Rabbi Professor David Golinkin, President of The Schechter Institutes, discusses Parshat Beha’alotcha and the six qualities that made Moses successful as head of the Israelites. Everyone from Biblical rulers to politicians today can find value in characteristics ranging from humility to a willingness to ask for help. 

How Do We Make Sense of the Insensible? Rabbi Avi Novis-Deutsch on Parshat Tazria-Metzora


Parshat Tazria-Metzora offers a confusing depiction of skin afflictions and potential treatments that, for many people, have little connection to modern life. Rabbi Avi Novis-Deutsch, Dean of the Schechter Rabbinical Seminary, suggests that the perplexing descriptions like “a white discoloration on the skin of his body which does not appear to be deeper than the skin and the hair in it has not turned white” (Lev. 13:4) may offer the modern reader an opportunity for self-examination about our relationships with God.