Learn about the Jewish Prayer Modes with Rabbi Avi Novis-Deutsch


Music and prayer have been combined since ancient times. A prayer tune, conveyed from generation to generation, sets the atmosphere for the service and allows the congregation to focus on the connection with the Divine.

Get right into the mode for the upcoming Holiday with Rabbi Avi Novis-Deutsch, as he explains with great emotion and passion how the same verse is recited in different tunes in multiple synagogues around the neighborhood.

What happens on the streets of Jerusalem during Selichot? Dr. Einat Ramon


Dr. Ramon describes the beautiful scene that takes place at the Western Wall, the Kotel, in the early pre-dawn hours during the month of Elul. She talks with yearning and wonder that will make you want to close your eyes and join her in the next Selichot prayer.

Selihot Already? Rabbi Prof. David Golinkin on Penitential Prayers


Why do some communities start reciting the Jewish Penitential prayers; Selihot in a certain period of time the Jewish month of Elul, and others only at a later date?

As we enter Elul Rabbi Professor David Golinkin, President of The Schechter Institutes explains the beautiful differences with the Selihot timings in the traditions of Persian, Sephardic and Ashkenazim Jews. Watch the video below:

Yom Kippur: Awareness of Our Human Vulnerability


There are probably numerous reasons people have for coming to shul for Kol Nidre, not least as stated in the prayers themselves: “We sanction prayer with the transgressors.” This phrase reflects the encounter of Jewish men and women who, on this night, are as transgressors who have come to ask forgiveness and atonement. But the heart of Kol Nidre does not deal with transgression; rather it pierces the human heart and highlights our vulnerability as humans, separate from our Creator.

Maximizing the Day of Judgment: From Repentance to Self-Worth / Rabbi Arie Hasit


The holiday that falls on the first two days of the Hebrew month of Tishrei has many names. Most famously, it is known as Rosh HaShana, the beginning of the year. Yet it is also called Yom Zikaron Tru’ah – the day of remembering the blast of the shofar, Yom Harat Olam – the day of the world’s beginning, and Yom HaDin, the day of judgment.

Why do we Wear a Kittel and use White Torah Mantles, Table Covers and Ark Curtains in the Synagogue on the High Holy Days? Responsa in a Moment: Volume 10, Issue No. 1, September 2015


Asked by Rabbi Rachel Schwartz on the behalf of a pupil at a Hebrew school in the United States: Why is the kittel worn on the High Holy Days? When were Torah scrolls first dressed in white for the High Holy Days and what prompted this change?