Tisha B’Av and the Mourning and Survival Patterns of Jews


As a modern-day researcher of Jewish thought, I especially love the personal descriptions that Jewish philosophers insert parenthetically into their Jewish philosophical text. These descriptions allow us to learn about central customs in Jewish community life, as well as the educational values and philosophical insights that were etched into the Jewish consciousness of the philosopher in question.   

Between Destruction and Redemption: Rabbi Avi Novis-Deutsch on Tisha B’Av


This Friday begins the Jewish month of Av and the nine days leading up to Tisha B’Av, the Ninth of Av, a day that commemorates the destruction of the Temples in Jerusalem and other tragedies that have befallen the Jewish people. Rabbi Avi Novis-Deutsch, Dean of the Schechter Rabbinical Seminary, suggests that the day is an opportunity to listen to unheard voices and to make room for diverse approaches to Judaism.

Tisha B’Av’s Place in Contemporary Society


Every year camp counselors confront a dilemma: what content is appropriate for Tisha B’Av when this fast day occurs during the camp season. Should the campers be expected to fast? The counselors? In many cases, commemorating Tisha B’Av is reduced to cancelling swimming or programming an activity related to the rabbinic midrash of Kamtza and Bar Kamtza on the destruction of the Temple. What indeed is Tisha B’Av’s place in contemporary society?

Is it Permissible to Renovate or Build a New Building During the Nine Days Which begin on Rosh Hodesh Av? Responsa in a Moment: Volume 10, Issue No. 8, July 2016


At the outset, I would like to stress the importance of the laws of Tisha B’av. On the one hand, I believe that it is very important to fast on Tisha B’av and to remember the Destruction in our day, even after the rebirth of the State of Israel and the reunification of Jerusalem. On the hand, there are many stringencies connected to “the three weeks” between the 17th of Tammuz and the 9th of Av, which were added in the Middle Ages by Aveilei Tziyon [= Mourners of Zion] and Ashkenazic rabbis, which have no Talmudic basis and which, in my opinion, there is no reason to observe.

Joy and Gladness on the Ninth of Av and Yom Ha’atzma’ut


As a Zionist and a religious Jew, I see God’s hand in the rebirth of the Jewish state, and the subsequent restoration of ancient Jerusalem and the Temple Mount to Jewish sovereignty. In fact, while most religious Zionists believe that the State of Israel marksthe beginning of the burgeoning of our redemption, my sense is that this rebirth and restoration are the totality of the promised redemption foretold by the prophets of yore, for which Jews have prayed for 2000 years.

Remembering the Destruction of the Temple – Good or Bad?* Responsa in a Moment: Volume 6, Issue No. 8, July 2012


I had the privilege of spending July 12-17, 2012 in Kiev as part of a joint mission of the Schechter Institute and Masorti Olami to install Rabbi Reuven Stamov as the first Masorti rabbi in the FSU. I taught this topic to the members of the mission at Kehillat Masoret, the new Masorti synagogue in Kiev, on Shabbat, July 14th. DG

The Blood is Still Seething : A Message for Tish’a B’Av 5771


One of the strangest tales told about the destruction of Jerusalem, its Temple and its inhabitants is to be found in the Babylonian Talmud (Gittin 57b; Sanhedrin 96b) concerning an encounter between Nebuzaradan and Zechariah Ben Yehoyadah. Though these two Biblical personages lived two and a half centuries apart, according to the Talmud they “met” on the Temple Mount during its destruction in the year 586 BCE.