SCHECHTER INSTITUTE
Home Hebrew


Schechter on Judaism

Ask The Rabbi

About the Graduate School
M.A. Tracks
M.A. Integrated Academic Programs
2015-2016 Course Catalog
Faculty
Research Institutes
Map of Graduates
Annual Report
Hebrew Website
About the Rabbinical Seminary
Course Catalog
Staff and Faculty
Map of Graduates
Annual Report
Iyunei Shabbat
About TALI
TALI Principles
Programs
Schools and Pre-Schools
TALI Textbooks
Visual Midrash - TALI Art and Judaism Website
Staff
Map of TALI Schools
Annual Report
TALI Hebrew Website
Neve Schechter
Midreshet Schechter in Israel
Midreshet Yerushalayim in Ukraine
Staff
Annual Report
About Our Publications
Schechter Bookstore
TALI Bookstore
Responsa in a Moment
Faculty Forum
Insight Israel
Ask The Rabbi
Iyunei Shabbat
The Midrash Project
About Women and Judaism
Jewish Law Watch
To Learn and To Teach
Nashim
MA Program
Board Members
Administration
Schechter in the Media
Schechter News
Annual Report 2015-16
Spring of Tolerance Campaign
The Voices of Schechter-Give Today
Donate Online
How to Give
What Your Donation Provides
New Campuses in Jerusalem and Tel Aviv
Endowment Campaign for The Schechter Institutes
Development News 2015-16
Facebook Logo Google Plus Logo YouTube Logo Receive updates
SCHECHTER ON JUDAISM     ASK THE RABBI
Print this page  Print
kredi kartı borç sorgulama
 
 
Ask the Schechter Rabbis a question at:
asktherabbi@schechter.ac.il
 

View All Titles By Date

Biblical Studies

Contemporary Issues in Jewish Law

Conversion

Ethics and Morality

Gender

Interfaith

Jewish Education

Jewish History

Jewish Symbols

Jewish Thought and Philosophy

Kashrut

Rabbinic Literature

Ritual

Shabbat

Israel

Theology and Ideology

Women and Judaism

Synagogue Life

Selected Issues in Jewish Law

Life Cycle

The Jewish Holidays

 

 
 
SHABBAT GOY
Rabbi Monique Susskind Goldberg

Question


Dear Rabbi,

It states in the Shulchan Aruch, that a Jew must not ask a non-Jew to do work for him on Shabbas. However, a Jew is allowed to hire a non-Jew to do work or business for him as long as he does not specify that it be done on Shabbat and does not benefit from it being done How then can an Orthodox Shul or Orthodox household employ a Shabbas goy? It seems to me to be forbidden. Could you explain with citations in English?

Thank You

Answer

First of all, the law states explicitly that as a general principle we may not ask a non-Jew to do anything on Shabbat that we may not do ourselves. (see for instance Maimonides, Mishne Torah, Hil. Shabbat 24:1).
There are exceptions to this rule in the following cases:
-Illness or emergencies
-Lighting a fire in cold weather
- Relieving an animal from pain
- If the act is done by a non-Jew for his own purpose, a Jew may benefit from it.

There is another category of work that is allowed by Jewish Law to ask a non-Jew to do, and those are the Rabbinical interdictions. For instance carrying an object in the public domain. For the sake of accomplishing a mitzvah (a commandment) one is allowed to ask a non-Jew to do a "work" that is a Rabbinical interdiction.

In the past people have stretched those exceptions and use "Shabbes Goy" to do all kind of forbidden work in the house, but with modern automatic devices it has become unnecessary.

Besides this point, some authorities gave a general principle that if the non-Jew is independent, is paid for the job as a whole, and is not specifically told to work on Shabbat, he may do his work.
An employee of a house or a synagogue who is assigned specific duties on Shabbat as part of his total responsibilities also comes under this category.

I hope things are clearer now for you.

 


The Schechter Institutes, Inc.:

Box 3566, P.O.Box 8500, Philadelphia, PA, 19178-3566, Tel: 1-866-830-3321, schechter@thelapingroup.com

Jerusalem Campus: Schechter Institute of Jewish Studies:

4 Avraham Granot St., Jerusalem, Israel, 91160, Tel: 972-747-800-600, pr@schechter.ac.il, www.schechter.edu

Tel Aviv Campus: Neve Schechter – Legacy Heritage Center for Jewish Culture:

42 Chelouche St., Neve Zedek, Tel: 03-5170358, office@neve.org.il, www.neve-schechter.org.il

The Schechter Institutes, Inc.:

Box 3566, P.O.Box 8500, Philadelphia, PA, 19178-3566, Tel: 1-866-830-3321, schechter@thelapingroup.com

Jerusalem Campus: Schechter Institute of Jewish Studies:

4 Avraham Granot St., Jerusalem, Israel, 91160, Tel: 972-747-800-600, pr@schechter.ac.il, www.schechter.edu

Tel Aviv Campus: Neve Schechter – Legacy Heritage Center for Jewish Culture:

42 Chelouche St., Neve Zedek, Tel: 03-5170358, office@neve.org.il, www.neve-schechter.org.il